Nanba Arts

Did you know?

That Nanba movement is the key to understanding the movements in the Japanese martial and performing arts? That Nanba runners in the Edo Period ran up to 85 km and more a day as fleet footed messengers? That Nanba has been used by Japanese Olympic athletes and marathon runners, including a Gold Medal Champion?

That Nanba has applications ranging from sports, to music, to health, and care giving, that can can improve performance and enhance enjoyment?

Click on the link below to download the attached file, which gives you a Quick Guide to Nanba.

quick-guide-to-nanba

Here are some videos showing applications of Nanba in the Arts.

Live recordings of Toho Gakuen Students Classical Music recitals give you an opportunity to see Nanba Musicians in action. (Windows Media Player required)

NANBA TAP

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The Taiko is a Japanese drum, and in this video Koya Sensei plays the Taiko while I improvise tap rhythms to it. Although Tap evolved with Jazz, it also fits well with other kinds of world music rhythms. I teach Nanba Tap Dance at Toho Gakuen, and we’re having fun mixing the two.

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Tap Magico Funk is a slideshow of photos taken from my Nanba Tap Class at Toho Gakuen School of Music, where students learn the basic steps and rhythms of Tap by applying the principles of Nanba Movement: Don’t Force, Don’t Twist, Don’t Disconnect. They develop balance, rhythm, timing, and other skills which they can apply when they perform and practice their instruments, even in Classical Music. Nanba also helps them practice without injury, and perform under pressure.

NANBA MARTIAL ARTS

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Tamaki Sensei is a professional Martial Artist and Nanba Instructor in Osaka. Here he demonstrates movements with the Naginata, maintaining Nanba principles throughout.

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Tamaki Sensei is a Master of Karate, and demonstrates movements which also illustrate the Nanba principles of Don‘t Force, Don’t Twist, and Don’t Disconnect. He also was able to move through a tight group of people without touching anyone, and like a Ninja almost disappearing before our eyes. You can imagine how from the movements here.

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These photos were taken by David Michaud of William Reed and Antonio Cacciatore. A slide show in flow.

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The Yagyu Shinkage style of sword dates back to late 16th Century Japan, and continues to this day. While it was once a highly guarded secret, today it is possible for sincere students to study. This is an excerpt from a lecture demonstration which William Reed did for a business group in Japan, on Budo and Education. Though the opponent strikes first, your sword arrives sooner. Nanba movement follows the opponent’s mind like a shadow.


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